Hey there!

I LOVE MARKETS! And we are in BANGKOK! Perfect combination! 

Everytime we go to a new place I have to visit at least one market. Foodmarket, fleamarket, whatever, doesn’t matter! Usually I’m not buying anything. But I just love to wonder around! Sooo I will show you two amazing markets from Bangkok! 

1. Damnoen Saduak Floating Market

This special market is located 100 km from Bangkok, in Damnoen Saduak Distirct, Ratchaburi Province. According to Wikipedia, this is the most famous flotating market. It has become primarily a tourist attraction, attracting domestic and foreign tourists as well.

For this experience is the best to book a tour! It is far away and no public buses are running there. Most of the tours are very expensive because they include many things which you don’t really need. (I’ve seen even for 2.500 baht = 75 euro).

After a proper research we found a half day tour for 500 baht / person (=15 euro). This was the cheapest, but your hotel may offer for less. This includes both the markets mentioned in this post.

From Bangkok it takes around 2 hours drive. (depending on traffic, of course, which can be mental)

We arrived to the floating market early in the morning, we jumped into a paddle boat and an old, local man was taking us around the canal. This is an additional 150 baht (=4.5 euro)

The market is busy in the morning, and it is open only until 2pm.

Here you can basically find everything: tiny Buddha statue, elephant souvenirs, special Thai products, food, ice cream, jewellery, clothes, magnets, all kind of Thai food, sweets, beer, etc.

These are the two kind of sales person you can find on the market: The man on his boat, paddling around, shouting, trying to sell his products. He was really good in paddling, he took us over at least tree times. 😀 And his boat was literally packed. (The famous local Chang beer in the back of his boat)

The woman sits there shouting her soul out. If a boat comes near her shop, she pulls it closer with a hook.  Sometimes it’s even emberasing not to buy anything 🙂

A little bit of fresh chicken and some thingies?
Many of the sellers are even cooking traditional thai dishes on the boat.

Because the market is mainly for tourists, the prices are really high considering to other markets. But it’s easy to bargain, and it is definitely worth it! Because they don’t really speak english, they put the price in a calculator and they show you. If you find the price too high, you take the calculator and put the price you’re willing to pay. After this moment is up to the sales person if he accepts or not.

Fact about bargaining: I was about to buy a bracelet. She asked for 400 baht (=12 euro). I took the calculator and I wrote 100 (=3euro) in it. She was fine with that 😀 

This Buddhist monk was my favourite photo-shot. 

It is not unusual to see monks in Thailand. 

According to the theculturetrip.com, every man in Thailand is required to become a monk for a period of time before the age of 20. Though the expected time length is about three months, some will stay as little as a day or two. The majority of monks remain for at least a few weeks. Young men do this in order to receive good karma and merit. 

Interesting fact: They are not allowed to talk or laugh loudly, and they cannot swim for fun.

2. Maeklong Railway Market

This was the second stop of the tour. Around 20 minutes drive from the Floating Market.

The Maeklong Railway is an actual  railway that runs for nearly 67 kilometres  between Wongwian Yai, Bangkok, and Samut Songkhram in central Thailand. The railway became famous for its route through the Maeklong Railway Market, nicknamed  “umbrella pulldown market”. It is one of the largest fresh seafood markets in Thailand, and is centred on the Maeklong Railway’s track.

At first it is an ordinary market except that between the two stand-lines there is railway running. 

Here you can find mostly food: fruits, vegetables, seafood, meat, etc. Just like the floating market, this one is a touristic place as well but many local people are buying stuff from here. That means the prices are lot smaller. It is super-crowded with tourists and locals.

The train passes the market 8 times a day. The locals know exactly what time it departures or arrives.

The train passes very close by the people but it’s also very slow and you can hear it from far. Honestly, it came so so close almost hit my head. But the sellers are really kind, they are shouting like crazy on tourists to be careful. I’ve seen a lady trowing ice on a careless tourist to move away from the railway. 😀

As I noticed, the train passing throught the market is not only an experience for the market-visitors but for the train-passengers as well. Many children waved and smiled to us, which was nice.  

Here you can see a thai lady probably heard the horn of the train because she started too pull her tent down. This is a very interesting procedure: the sellers in a few seconds pull the umbrellas down, pushing their stands back. Literally moving around a half meter on the sides. It’s a routine for them, you can clearly see they didn’t started today 🙂

After the train left, in another few seconds they put back everything how it was before and they continue their bargain.

Few news from our Journey:

  • we are on the road for 44 days
  • we are in Thailand since the end of december, until now we were mostly on the beach. We now stay for a week in Bangkok and another few days in Kanchanaburi because finally I found an ethical Elephant sanctuary what we definitely gonna visit 😀 😀 
  • we got the   V I S A   for Cambodia 😀
  • we applied for the vietnamese Visa in Bangkok (scary to be without passport for 4 days on the other side of the world *_*)
  • we still try not to set eachother on fire after being together all the time 😀

Thanks for reading, until next time!

Oh, if you have any ideas, or what you are interested in, curious about something what maybe doesn’t come to my mind, please message, comment, anything! I need feedback and I’m also happy to write about what people are interested in.

🌴🌴🌴

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